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Staff Editorial: No faith in Santorum

By Duke Staff
On March 7, 2012

The results of Super Tuesday's 10 primary elections were both expected and surprising. As expected, Mitt Romney won the majority of the states' primaries — six out of 10 — and gained 216 out of the 395 Super Tuesday delegates.

But, surprisingly for some, Rick Santorum won three states and gave Romney a close run in Ohio, losing by less than 1 percent.

Santorum's successes caught some political analysts and Romney off guard, but Tuesday's semi-close contest should hardly come as a surprise. It is clear by now that Republican primary voters are hardly pleased with their options.

Santorum appeals to both socially conservative voters and those against Romney. His supporters also see him as much more down to earth than his fellow candidates, and his meager $6.7 million campaign supports this image, especially when compared to Romney's, which raised $11.5 million in February alone and has a total of $63.7 million, according to The New York Times.

While Santorum's mounting support makes sense in some ways, in others, it is perplexing. Although he hasn't held a public position since Bob Casey beat him in 2006, Santorum somehow managed to draw national attention with disturbing public comments over the past few years that reveal his outrageous positions on some of our country's most debated issues.

In 2008, he equated same-sex marriage with polygamy and incest, and paralleled gay sex to "man-on-child" and "man-on-dog" sex.

In August 2011, he said abortion should be outlawed in all cases, claiming that "to put rape or incest victims through another trauma of an abortion, I think is too much to ask." Furthermore, women impregnated through rape, he said, should "make the best of a bad situation" and "accept what God has given to you."

Since he began campaigning for GOP candidacy, Santorum has added to his dumbfounding comments. On Jan. 2, while speaking about welfare, he said "I don't want to make black people's lives better by giving them somebody else's money." (Note: he was speaking in Iowa, where only 9 percent of welfare recipients are black, while 84 percent are white, according to CBS news.) He soon claimed that he had uttered a filler word — "bleaugh" — not "black."

Every politician says insensitive and stupid things from time to time, but Santorum's record reveals a man whose views border the outrageousness level of Rick Perry and Herman Cain. Just as voters realized that these men were not suitable candidates for the Republican Presidential nomination, we can only hope that they will realize the same about Santorum, and soon.


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